top of page

Indian New year 2023 - Lunar vs Solar New Year


Celebrating Solar and Lunar New Year in India
Indian New Year 2023

The New Year is a universal holiday that is celebrated everywhere. The day ushers in a brand-new calendar year and is typically marked by celebrations, resolutions, and happy occasions. The idea of a new year is observed on numerous calendars and is celebrated in a variety of ways, with the Solar New Year and Lunar New Year being the two most common. Both sorts of New Year's are fervently and enthusiastically observed in India. This blog will go over the distinctions between and significance of India's Solar and Lunar New Year celebrations.


Celebrations of the Solar New Year


The new year that ushers in the solar calendar is referred to as the solar new year. The day of the vernal equinox, which commonly occurs on March 20 or 21 each year, is when it is traditionally observed. The Solar New Year is significant because it coincides with the spring equinox, which in the northern hemisphere is the first day of spring. In different regions of India, the day is observed with a variety of ceremonies and celebrations.


In India, the Solar New Year is observed in several different states, each of which distinctively observes the day. The Bihu celebration, which commemorates the Solar New Year, is observed in the North East. The Solar New Year is observed during the Vishu festival in Kerala and the Baishakhi festival in Punjab. In Uttarakhand, Mesha Sankranti is observed, and in Tamilnadu, the Puthandu festival. The Solar New Year is also observed at the Buisu festival in Tripura, Pana Sankranti in Odisha, Pahela Baishakh in West Bengal, and Jur Sital in Bihar.


Comparison of the Lunar and Solar New Years

The connection to the solar and lunar calendars, respectively, is what distinguishes the Lunar and Solar New Year celebrations. The first new moon that appears between January 21 and February 20 is related to the Lunar New Year, whe


reas the Solar New Year is linked to the spring equinox. While the Lunar New Year is connected with moon worship, the Solar New Year is marked by a variety of celebrations and ceremonies, including the worship of the Sun God.

India celebrates both the Solar and Lunar New Year

The New Year is one of the most important cultural celebrations in India, a nation with many different cultures, traditions, and religions. It's interesting to note that India observes both the solar and lunar new Year. Across the nation, people are celebrating the New Year with a great deal of joy, excitement, and enthusiasm. The distinction between the Solar and Lunar New Year, Indian New Year celebrations, and festivals observed during the Solar and Lunar New Year will all be covered in this blog.

Solar vs. Lunar New Year: What’s the Difference?

The Solar New Year is based on the solar calendar, which tracks the Earth's location around the sun and is determined by the sun's movement. On the other hand, the Lunar New Year is based on the lunar calendar and is decided by the phases of the moon. The first new moon between January 21 and February 20 marks the Lunar New Year, while April 14 or 15, depending on the region, marks the start of the Solar New Year. Despite their distinctions, both types of New Year celebrations are quite important and are enthusiastically observed throughout India. Both sorts of New Year are celebrated with gift-giving, eating, and quality time with loved ones. Each state distinctively observes the day, adding to the event's cultural significance. Celebrations Associated with the Solar New Year.



India celebrates the Solar New Year with great fervour and zeal. The following are a few of the significant holidays observed during the Solar New Year:

Celebrating Solar and Lunar New Year in India
One Nation Many Celebration

Bihu Festival in North East India

The Indian state of Assam celebrates the harvest festival known as Bihu. The harvesting season concludes the three-day festivity. There are three ways to celebrate the festival: Rongali, also known as Bohag Bihu; Kongali, also known as Kati Bihu; and Bhogali, also known as Magh Bihu. The Assamese New Year officially begins on Rongali Bihu, sometimes referred to as Bohag Bihu, which is observed in the middle of April. Traditional dance displays, music, and eating characterise the festival.


Vishu Festival in Kerala

Kerala, an Indian state in the south, hosts the Hindu festival of Vishu. It is observed on April 14 or 15, which is the first day of the Malayalam month of Medam. On the Malayalam calendar, the event signifies the start of the New Year. The Vishukkani, literally translated as "the first thing seen on Vishu day," is the primary attraction of Vishu. A platter filled with commodities including rice, fruits, vegetables, gold money, and flowers makes up the Vishukkani. Along with food, traditional games, and fireworks, the celebration is also marked by them.


Baishakhi Festival in Punjab

A celebration called Baishakhi, often called Vaisakhi is observed in Punjab, a state in northwest India. As per the Punjabi calendar, it is a harvest celebration that ushers in the New Year. With traditional music, dancing performances, and eating, the event is observed with tremendous zeal and excitement. The Nagar Kirtan, a religious parade that happens in the streets, is the major event of Baishakhi.


Mesha Sankranti in Uttarakhand

India's northern state of Uttarakhand observes the festival of Mesha Sankranti. On the Hindu solar calendar, it signifies the start of the New Year. Traditional dance performances, singing, and feasting are all part of the festival's lively celebration.


Puthandu Festival in Tamil Nadu

Puthandu, commonly referred to as Tamil New Year, is a festival that takes place in Tamil Nadu, a state in southern India. It is observed on April 14 or 15, which is the first day of the Tamil month of Chithirai. Tamil New Year officially begins on the day of the festival. The Panchanga Sravanam, or reading of the New Year's almanac, is Puthandu's principal event. Traditional dance performances, music, and eating are other festival hallmarks.


Festival of Buisu in Tripura

In the Indian state of Tripura, which is in the northeast, a celebration called Buisu is held. As per the Tripuri calendar, it is a harvest festival that ushers in the New Year. Traditional dance performances, singing, and feasting are all part of the festival celebration.


Pana Sankranti in Odisha

In the eastern Indian state of Odisha, Pana Sankranti—also known as Maha Vishuba Sankranti—is a festival that is observed. On the Hindu solar calendar, it signifies the start of the New Year. Traditional dance performances, singing, and feasting are all part of the festival celebration.


Pahela Baishakh in West Bengal

The eastern Indian state of West Bengal observes Pahela Baishakh, sometimes referred to as the Bengali New Year. Bengali New Year officially begins today. Traditional music, dancing performances, and eating are used to celebrate the occasion.



Conclusion


In certain regions of India, New Year celebrations, whether Solar or Lunar, are celebrated with a great deal of fervour. The Lunar New Year is observed on the day of the first new moon that appears between January 21 and February 20, whereas the Solar New Year is observed on the day of the spring equinox. In some regions of India, both sorts of New Year celebrations are held with great fervour, with each state having its distinctive method of commemorating the day.

A new year is a time to rejoice in fresh starts and anticipate the future with hope and optimism. India's numerous New Year celebrations are a reflection of the nation's diversity and cultural wealth. Each celebration has its special traditions, rituals, and customs, whether it is the Bihu festival in the North East, the Vishu festival in Kerala, the Baishakhi festival in Punjab, or the Puthandu festival in Tamil Nadu. The solar and lunar New Year's differ significantly from one another since the former is determined by the location of the sun while the latter is determined by the phases of the moon. Both New Year's celebrations are significant and are ingrained in India's cultural traditions.

In conclusion, the New Year's celebration in India is a lovely representation of the nation's rich cultural legacy. Both the Solar and Lunar New Year celebrations are distinctive in their own right and are of utmost importance. These gatherings foster a sense of community and cultural variety by bringing individuals from all walks of life together. As we begin a new year, it is crucial to keep in mind how important it is to celebrate such milestones and to recognise how diverse India's cultures are. Let's all wish for a joyous, prosperous, and united New Year that is full of love. Let's embrace the spirit of optimism, happiness, and hope as we ring in the new year. Let's put the problems of the past behind us and look forwards to the future with newfound vigour. I want to wish everyone a very happy new year!


References:

"Solar and Lunar New Year." World Culture Encyclopedia, World Culture Encyclopedia, 2023, http://www.everyculture.com/index.html.

"Solar New Year and Lunar New Year." Times of India, Times of India, 2 Feb. 2022, http://www.timesofindia.com/


268 views0 comments

Comments

Rated 0 out of 5 stars.
No ratings yet

Add a rating
bottom of page